Keep it short

I have been thinking about resumes a great deal lately. Since I recently passed the Bar Exam, I have been revising and sending out my resume in search of a legal job. At my current job, I have also fairly recently reviewed several resumes from new applicants. I cannot claim to be a resume expert, and I will not try to give any detailed advice. But there is one thing that many people that have given me advice have all agreed on, and that I wish the people sending in resumes that I have to review had remembered.

Keep it short.

When I looked into resumes before while looking for technical jobs and more recently when I was looking into them for legal jobs, virtually everyone recommended keeping them short. When I review resumes, I distinctly prefer them short. Exactly what short means varies somewhat by who is giving the advice, but some of them recommend strictly keeping it down to one page and a few others say that two is acceptable. When I have reviewed resumes at different times, a second page has never bothered me. But I have been rather annoyed when I have reviewed resumes as long as sixteen pages.

Generally, keeping it short will help ensure that the important information is easy to find and review. The unimportant information does not need to be there at all. There are occasions when a potential employer wants something longer and more detailed. However, those employers will generally make that clear by asking for a C.V. or even a portfolio rather than a resume. With a bit of help from a skilled counselor at my law school, I ruthlessly trimmed my resume down to one page, and I think it is stronger now that it is shorter.

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